Archive for racing

Does Your LowBack Ever Get a Little Cranky or Stiff?

Low back stiffness and pain is epedemic in this day and age. And the truth is, there are SO many potential causes for stiffness or pain in the low back. So, let's get this out of the way - it's not in my job description to diagnose, and even if it was, I'm sure as hell not going to try and diagnose in a blog post  - that'd be kind of ridiculous.

However, what I CAN do...is share a video that I shot this past week for my coached athletes. In it, I get right to the heart of ONE of many reasons why our back can get a little cranky.

I've seen this over and over again in a variety of people, from all walks of life and activity levels, especially, runners....OR (gasp!)...pain-addicted sickos who, for whatever reason, like to do side planking!

We ALL love to hate that one - it sucks so good, right?

THREE Common Causes of Low Back Stiffness and Pain

Before I get to the video I mentioned above, know this: In my experience working with athletes from different backgrounds and age groups who occasionally struggle with low back pain or soreness...

...in the majority of cases (that aren't the result of a traumatic injury like a crash) the issues are usually related to these...

  1. The hips aren't as mobile as they need to be:  We need the hips to move or the back will have to. As I have often said, the body will absolutely get movement from somewhere - the question is, is it the right somewhere. (This is the biggest culprit if you're typically "tight" or "stiff" or consider yourself inflexible).
  2. The hips aren't as stable or strong as they need to be: This is another way of saying the low back ends up having to compensate - and "pretends" to be the butt! Not a good thing.
  3. The core/trunk isn't as stable as it needs to be: Without a stable core, the low back WILL take a beating. In other words, if those smaller muscles throughout the trunk (whose job it is to make sure the spine and entire trunk functions as it should) aren't in synchrony with each other and integrated holistically with the other parts of the body, it's not if you'll have back pain, it's simply when.

To be sure, these aren't the ONLY reasons, but they're the top three.

Or are they?

As I think of it, there's also a FOURTH common cause.

And that is????

To get the answer to that question, you'll need to CLICK on the image to the left...

...and check out a 12-minute long video that I referred to above.

In it, I get right to this FOURTH reason for low back stiffness.

And, I give you four specific movements you can do to alleviate that stiffness right now.

You and I know any kind of low back pain and stiffness sucks. And if you can relate, then maybe I can help.

What are you waiting for? Click the above image and get right to it.

To your success,
Al

PS: If you're not following me on Instagram, pursuitathlete is my IG handle. I plan on continuing to share more cool training ideas and concepts in the future.

PSS: If you believe this post has been helpful and you'd be interested in hearing from me on a more regular basis via email, you can CLICK HERE to subscribe. I hope you've considered the time it took you to read this as time well spent. 🙂

Three Mistakes Many Beginning Runners Make (and How To Avoid Them!)

So today's post is straight forward: I'm going to talk about some of the "mistakes" I typically see beginning runners make.  If you're interested in learning what those are (and what to do to avoid them), keep reading.

One of the things I really enjoy as a coach is helping someone not only begin a running program, but most importantly be able to continue it so that they successfully reach the point in time I refer to as the "satisfying" stage of running. If you've been running for any length of time, you know first hand what I mean. It's that point when you finally start to feel better as you run and can really feel some of the fitness benefits. Those early days and weeks AREN'T easy. With time, determination and consistency however, there's very few things we can do for our health that are more rewarding and satisfying than running!

The secret to getting to the "satisfying" stage of run development is doing it the "right way."   One major step toward doing it the “right way” is to make sure you avoid injury.

If you can manage to avoid injury, you'll build your fitness steadily and consistently and be able to enjoy the benefits of an incredibly satisfying fitness activity. And you'l smile a LOT! 🙂  On the other hand, if you end up injured, you'll soon learn what it's like to be SO frustrated and angry, wondering where to turn for answers as to why you have that pain, and most importantly, what you can or should do about it.

If you STOP running, you start to lose that fitness and the momentum you worked so damn hard for. On the other hand, if you try to KEEP running right through the pain, it will inevitably only get worse, setting you up for even more frustration, anger, and fear about your future as a runner.

Before I go on, I want you to ask yourself an important question: Do you know why you want to do this? Whether it’s to gain more energy, feel younger, be healthier, look better, lower your blood pressure, lose weight, or finish a marathon, recognizing WHAT your primary motivation is may be the MOST important element for success, because it is THAT reason that will inspire you, drive you, motivate you, and create the burning desire that YOU WILL NEED to achieve the rewards you desire!

So, now that I’ve got that out of the way, let's get to some of those mistakes. Avoid these and you'll be well on your way to an enjoyable life of running.


Mistake #1: 

Doing too much mileage - progressing too fast, too soon.  “Patience and fortitude conquer all things.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

The most common mistake many beginning runners make is to let their initial enthusiasm "run" rampant by running too many miles too soon, going farther and more frequently then their bodies are truly ready for. The risk of this happening is much higher, earlier, when motivation is high and there are no aches and pains in your legs!

However, as the days turn into a week, and then two weeks, the knees, hips, shins, and low back begin to feel some tweaks. If those runners don’t heed these warning signs that the body is beginning to rebel, before too long they will most surely have an injury, and then BAM!, just like that, the new passion for running is stopped DEAD in its tracks. Game over!

How do you prevent this mistake from happening?Be more conservative than you think you need to be with how often, how long, and how much you run, especially early on in your development.

If you are completely new to running or just getting back into it, start with walking first, and then slowly and progressively add small amounts of running into the mix.  For example, I typically recommend a runner take a minimum of 10 weeks to progress to 30 minutes straight running. Start with 30 seconds of walking and 30 seconds of running for 10 or 15 minutes and progress conservatively from there.

Be aware of the warning signs of injury.  If you feel ANY pain that you don’t think is normal for what you are doing, STOP immediately and walk home, or call for a ride home. Doing this could literally SAVE you weeks or months of down time away from the sport.

Be aware that very often injuries sneak up on you; they don’t always happen when you might expect them to. Be aware, listen to your body!
Take AT LEAST one complete day off from exercise each and every week.  Take REST days seriously! It’s when you rest that your body adapts and gets stronger!


Mistake #2:

Not developing core stability or doing any strength training. 

“A terrace nine stories high begins with a pile of earth.” – Lao-tzu

Many beginning runners think that running will make them stronger, so they start a running program without realizing this fact: running in and of itself will not make you stronger!  Rather, running actually breaks you down making you weaker in many ways!

As you may know, with each stride you are landing with about three-times your body-weight in impact forces.  Not only that, the less optimal your running form is, the higher the impact forces are. What is helping to absorb this pounding and keep your body from taking a tortuous beating? The answer is, your CORE should be!

The real true secret to avoiding injury and improving as a runner is to develop a stronger, more durable and stable FOUNDATION.  When your foundation is weak, your form deteriorates as you get more tired. You are forced to slow down or even stop, while your risk of injury goes up because your legs are forced to absorb the pounding your core should be absorbing.

If you don’t improve the stability and strength of your core in a running specific way, and treat your legs to some running-specific functional strength training, you will eventually find yourself injured. How can you develop your entire trunk and core for more powerful and injury free running?   Make the choice TODAY to incorporate as little as 10-minutes of core training, 2 to 3 times per week, into your weekly running routine.
Not sure what to do? Keep it simple, not complex!  Get in touch if I can help.


Mistake #3:

Not making the effort to learn what your inherent risk of injury might be, or where you might be weak, unstable, or out of balance.  

“To thine own self be true." – Shakespeare

The simple truth is that unless you take the time and make the effort to learn about your own body, where you might be imbalanced, weak, or unstable, and then take the steps to correct whatever those things are, you're going to get injured. It's just a matter of time.

No one in their right mind would invest in or buy a house without first checking to ensure the foundation is strong and the mechanicals in the house such as the plumbing and electric are sound and working well. Why don't we do the same thing when it's our own bodies, especially when it's our long term health and happiness that's at stake?

So how do you avoid making this mistake? If you REALLY want to know what the answer is and what your options are, get in touch with me directly via email and I'll tell you what I've learned the hard way.

Have a great week!
To Your Success,
~Coach Al

Are You Doing THIS, and Self Sabotaging Your Success?

Today’s I'm sharing something that at times frustrates the coach in me, I won't lie. Perhaps more than almost anything. And I know it shouldn’t, because…well, it’s the humanity in all of us. But if only…

So what is it?

Our constant need to self-judge at every turn or moment, during training and racing.

Trust me, I’ve been there. We all have. It’s our universal human nature to do this thing, self-judging right in the midst of when we're out there training and racing, that can be so destructive if we let it.

Many years ago, a smart friend reminded me that expectations are often the worst thing we can have. In any situation, of the three possible outcomes, two aren’t very attractive and can lead to frustration and sadness. After all, if an expectation is met, you naturally nod and go, “well, I expected it (so no big deal). If its not met, you’re inevitably and disappointed. Frustrated. Even angry.

Every workout or training session you do ISN’T a pass or fail TEST, that determines whether your training is moving in the right direction, or if you’re fit, or even if you’re any good.

Every race you do ISN’T a reflection of your fitness or preparation. Or even your value as a human being! It's just a single race. One event. On one day. That's all. 

When you go into any experience or training session or race with an expectation for it to be a certain way... or for you to feel a certain way, you’re setting up the chance of being disappointed. And the negative self-talk that comes out of that disappointment is sure to rob you of the joy of just being out there!

My friend, that sucks!

Because getting out there to train and race and participate on whatever level you are able, should above all else, be joyous. And affirming.

My advice?

Just do.

Just be.

Don’t let what happens in any moment in time detract from you just DOING what you set out to do, the very best you can, in that moment.  Take it all as it comes. Go with the flow. It’s neither “good” nor “bad,” it just is.

Take satisfaction from knowing you did the best you could in that moment. Pat yourself on the back.

**Select the words you use when you talk to yourself, with care. They will inevitably trigger thoughts, images and feelings, both positive and negative.

**Accept occasional setbacks and difficulties as normal and natural parts of life and training - decide to rise above them and carry on. Just do!

While it might not seem realistic at times, the simple truth is that we all need to talk to ourselves positively, not just some of the time, but ALL the time. Talk about things the way you want them to be rather than the way they might be in a moment in time.

Don’t let the inevitable ebb and flow of life (and training) suck the joy out of doing what you most love to do.

Al, we all have our negative inner critic, but never forget how awesome you are and how hard you’re working and fighting to do your best every day. Trust me, I’m right there with you!

To your success,
Al

PS: A while back I recorded a short audio on "Self Talk" for my coached athletes. Many of them told me it helped tremendously to keep them focused on the kinds of self talk that leads to better outcomes. If you'd like to listen, CLICK HERE to right click and download it for listening now or later on. I hope it helps!

This exercise has SO many benefits. Check it out!

Happy Friday my friend! I hope your day has started off great.

If you have any interest in getting stronger, perhaps progressing your pull up/chin up (or getting your first!) or... doing any overhead pressing and doing it safely, keep reading. I've got some important tips for you.

There are two very important questions I ask first, before I program any training for an athlete. Both of these questions deal directly with their safety (minimizing their risk of injury) and maximizing their potential to progress the activity, e.g. do more of it and get better at it.

What are those questions?

  1. Do they possess the movement prerequisites to perform the exercise, sport or activity?
  2. Do they possess the basic and fundamental skills and ability necessary to perform them safely and progressively?

Checking with my online dictionary :), I can quickly confirm that a prerequisite is defined as "a thing that is required as a prior condition for something else to happen or exist."

For example, let's say you want to start doing pull ups...but when you try, you struggle getting your shoulder to move through any range of motion, or maybe you can't quite get your arms overhead. In this instance, you honestly have no business trying to pick up a weight and put it overhead, right? The prerequisite in this case is shoulder range of motion.

Following me so far? (You'd be surprised how many fitness programs and trainers never actually check to see whether an athlete has that prerequisite ability before loading folks up with weight! That's a bad deal).

Fundamental skills and ability sorta speak for themselves, yes?  If you're not sure what I mean, here's an analogy: don't you think your kid needs to have a good handle on basic arithmetic, before their teacher will have them move on to algebra or calculus?  Smart training that pays positive dividends is no different. Move to more advanced skills without mastering the basics first, and your risk of injury is going to skyrocket while your ability to progress the training nosedives.


Train smart: make THIS part of your daily routine!

Since I've been talking about pull ups and chin ups, (or overhead pressing), I'm going to share with you one of the greatest exercises I (or any other coach or trainer for that matter) has ever programmed for another. It's that awesome and that beneficial.

Click on the image to the left to check out an informal video of this exercise. I did this video for my friends over at Vibesworkshop.com. In it, I'll teach you this exercise.  It's called a Wall-slide.

As I said earlier, this exercise has so many benefits, they're almost too numerous to mention. Here are the three most important:

  1. It's a great exercise to establish and practice fundamental core stability while your arms are overhead and you're squatting.
  2. It will help you simultaneously open up the front of your chest/trunk (which, admit it, has gotten tighter since you started staring at your smartphone for hours on end!), while also stabilizing and strengthening your back and shoulders.
  3. It'll help you get your thoracic spine moving (that portion of your spine between your neck and low back), which is a very good thing.

If you find doing this is challenging (assuming you're doing it correctly of course), you'll likely be compensating when doing any overhead work. That means a big risk of injury. It may mean your t-spine isn't moving as it should. It may also mean you're super tight around the chest area and in need of some shoulder stability work! Regardless, you'll get so much benefit from making the Wall-slide part of your daily routine.

So, get on it! 🙂

Got questions or something I can help with? Get in touch!

To your success,
~Al

Are you helping or hurting your chance for a great race with your pre-race meal?

I've seen it happen so often over the years - you've trained hard for weeks and months, doing everything you can to be ready to have a great race. And then your stomach goes south - at the worst possible time during the race.  It sucks when that happens. There's nothing more frustrating.

Gastrointestinal intestinal (GI) distress has ruined more than a few race days for some otherwise very fit, very prepared athletes. Unfortunately, it doesn't matter how fit you are...if you are having GI issues, you know? You can't race to the max if you're sick, nauseous, or vomiting.

The first step in fixing problems is to accept that most races are, first and foremost, "eating and drinking contests."


It matters what you eat before a race...

I shot a 10-minute video (with a somewhat gross demo - sorry!) to discuss what I see is perhaps the most common mistake a triathlete or runner can make with their pre-race meal. Click on my picture to the left to check it out.

What are some of the important take home messages?

* Eat your pre-race meal at least 3 hours before race start.
* Make sure you eat simple, easily digestible foods which you've practiced eating prior to training sessions.
* Avoid taking in any calories between the meal and the start of the race. (Do continue to hydrate).
* Less is more - be kind to your stomach.

If you're racing this weekend, good luck and have fun! (And eat early and light!) 🙂

    Train (and eat) smart!

    To your success,
    ~Al

    004: Traveling to A Race? Techniques to Stay Healthy And Race Your Best (Podcast)

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    Hello Everyone!

    Coach Al Lyman and Dr. Kurt Strecker here discussing the challenges associated with staying healthy while traveling, especially to your races.

    Long flights and drives require staying hydrated, maintaining good posture, and taking frequent breaks. Airplanes in particular can be hard on the body, so implementing some easy techniques can make all the difference. Low back and neck supports can be as simple as a strategically placed rolled sweatshirt, and they can minimize the post-travel aches and pains. Once you’ve reached your destination, doing some basic mobility and stability work can help you start your race feeling fresh.

    Tune into the full podcast for all the tips and techniques!

    Be GREAT!

    Coach Al and Kurt

    We hope you enjoy our podcasts and find them useful for your training and racing. Any questions? Hit us up in the comments, or on Facebook. Let us know of any topics you would like us to cover too.

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    Ask Coach Al: Make Every Race Count

    Hello Everyone!

    I've received a few questions recently from triathletes, runners, and cyclists about racing, and how to approach those efforts. It's a good time to review some basics about prioritizing races, how to approach each event, and how to think about your goals, and determine your focus.

    Get back to me with any questions, and I'll be happy to go more in depth on any issues you may have.

    Race season is ON!

    Coach Al

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