Archive for Triathlon

035: Open Water Swimming with Alcatraz Legend Gary Emich [Podcast]

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Elite open water swimmer and coach, Gary Emich

Elite open water swimmer and coach, Gary Emich

Today we’re stoked to have Alcatraz swimming legend and triathlon coach, Gary Emich, on our podcast. Gary is most well known for having completed over 1000 Alcatraz swims (without a wetsuit!) and for a host of other impressive open water swimming accomplishments. 

Gary is a Certified Level 1 USA Triathlon Coach specializing in open water swimming and a Certified Level 2 ASCA Coach.  He is co-host and co-producer of the DVD “Lane Lines to Shore Lines:  Your Complete Guide to Open Water Swimming” and co-author of “Open Water Swimming:  Lessons from Alcatraz.”  And, from 1998 through 2009 he was the race director for the “Alcatraz Challenge Aquathlon & Swim.” His open water swimming CV includes the Amazon River replete with piranhas; Peru’s Lake Titicaca; Scotland’s legendary Loch Ness; the Hellespont (a swim from Europe to Asia); and the 20km Rottnest swim at the age of 58.  Relay crossings include the English Channel (2000 and 2011), Catalina, Santa Barbara, Monterey Bay, the Bay of Naples (Italy) and the Strait of Gibraltar as well as relay circumnavigations of Manhattan, Key West and Pennock Island in Ketchikan Alaska.

 

On today’s podcast, Gary and I chat about all things open water swimming related including…

  • Navigation and sighting: What’s the impact of poor sighting? Tips and drills on how to improve this critical skill
  • Wind, waves and current and how to deal most effectively with these challenges
  • How training in the pool can cheat you
  • Safety considerations for swimming in the open water
  • Race starts and finishes
  • Goggles: what are the most important considerations for open water swimming?
  • Triangulation: what is it, and how can it help you in the open water?
  • Are you a bilateral breather?  Is it a worthwhile skill to develop?
  • And much more!

Thanks for joining us! Make your next open water swim a great one!

~Coach Al

ps: Here’s a neat funny which I know you’ll enjoy!

Fraz

Get Out! (Of Your Comfort Zone That Is)

 A dream is your creative vision for your life in the future. You must break out of your current comfort zone and become comfortable with the unfamiliar and the unknown. ~ Denis Waitley

One can choose to go back toward safety or forward toward growth. Growth must be chosen again and again; fear must be overcome again and again~Abraham Maslow


Life Begins Outside Of Your Comfort Zone!

Life Begins Outside Of Your Comfort Zone!

Throughout everyday life, each of us has certain physical and psychological  ”comfort zones” that influence who we are and how we act.  Perhaps you follow the same routine when you wake up in the morning, or drive the same route to your job each day.  Similarly, from a training standpoint, do you tend to migrate toward the same pace, intensity, or routine, day in and day out, because it is “comfortable”?  I thought so!  :)

Physical comfort zones are usually easy to identify.  For example, if you have recently trained at or around 8 minutes per mile during your long aerobic runs and suddenly increase that pace to 6 minutes per mile, you will quickly step outside of your comfort zone.  Running at 6 minute pace quickly elevates your heart rate and perceived effort, immediately putting you outside your comfort zone! 

Psychological comfort zones can be a bit harder to quantify, but here’s an example. I think we can all agree that for most of us, talking one on one to a friend or two is usually not that tough.  But, stand up in a room in front of a live audience and try to give a speech while everyone is staring at you is a lot more difficult, and perhaps way outside of the comfort zone for many of us!

A KEY TO PERSONAL GROWTH AND SUCCESS

 In my opinion, one key that can unlock the potential for greater personal growth and success in many of life’s endeavors is the willingness to step outside of comfort zones.   If you’re going to reach your potential as an athlete, as you execute your training program you must resist the temptation to always do the same thing, in effect resorting back to that which is “comfortable” for you.  After all, it feels absolutely fantastic when we do finally step outside and as a result, experience some success!  Remember what it was like when you were nervous about asking someone out for a date? For most of us, this was well outside our comfort zones, yet how great did it feel when they said, “Yes!”  From a training standpoint, do you remember ever focusing your time and energy on developing a certain skill or technique?  Do you remember how good it felt when you realized you were getting BETTER at that activity because you did things a bit differently?  Far too often we train and perform activities the way we always have, staying with what is comfortable for us.  Routinely doing things the same old way (training pace, intensity, route, focus, etc.) prevents us from growing and improving.  We like to be comfortable!  Resist it, reach out, expand your horizons, and take some risks!  Improve!

 WHY ARE COMFORT ZONES “COMFORTABLE”?

There are two major factors that stop most of us from stepping outside our comfort zones more often.  The first is habit.  Simply put, out of habit, we tend to migrate to that which we are familiar with or that gives us a sense of security and safety.  The second and perhaps most significant factor is fear.  Fear of failure. Let’s face it, at one time or another we are all afraid to fail.  But we all know but rarely admit to ourselves, that the real consequences of “failure” are truly inconsequential and never last long.

As athletes, most of the fear we have when we step outside our comfort zone and try something new is all in our head. The fear is a figment of our imagination.  It just never seems that way at the moment of truth!  As an example, all of you triathletes out there, take open water swim starts (which tend to give many first time triathletes a fit).  Be honest, you know you’re not going to drown!  You know that nothing “down there” is going to swim up and get you!  You know everyone in attendance wants you to succeed!  All the other athletes have the same goal as you, to get to the finish line!  Whatever fear you may experience is only in your thoughts, and you control your thoughts, no one else.  Fear limits what we do and who we are, and ultimately, what we can achieve.

COMFORT” ZONE AND “GRAY” ZONE:

IS THERE A CORRELATION?

 Applying these concepts to your training on a consistent basis can be a key to unlocking untapped potential.  However, and this is important, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to always go harder and/or faster!  As an example, getting outside of your comfort zone may mean running, riding, or swimming more slowly on certain training days, when your mind might be telling you that you “should” be going faster.  Or, it may mean doing more drill or skill work in a training session when it might be more “comfortable” if you didn’t include skill/technique work.  In fact, failure to get outside of your training comfort zones relates very much to smartly differentiating pace and intensity in training, something I routinely remind athletes about.

Gray zone training is addictive and easy to succumb to because going “sort of” hard can and often is “comfortable” for many of us.  Think about that. When you’re training “sort of” hard but not REALLY hard (e.g. gray zone), you are in no man’s land. You are much better off either going easier than is “comfortable” for you (aerobic or even easier for recovery), or if your training program calls for it, going much HARDER than is comfortable. In fact, getting the maximum benefit from your training program means being way outside of your comfort zone during hard (quality) training sessions. It means going VERY hard and being VERY uncomfortable!

 THE BOTTOM LINE?

Though it may not always be obvious on a daily basis, consistently getting outside of comfort zones even just a little bit can lead to unbelievable results in your training and racing.  Starting today, have the courage and mental strength to “step out” regularly both physically and psychologically, and I guarantee you’ll get better and faster than ever!  Make it a great day!

~Coach Al 

034: Is “Minimalist” The Best Way To Train? [Podcast]

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PAP Podcasts Videos Triathlon TrainingOn just about a daily basis, Kurt and I get questions about what we feel are the optimal ways to train if you’re an endurance athlete. Do we believe higher volume training is a necessary component for success over long distances, or do we believe “minimalist” training is the way to go. What we preach and believe is born from a variety of factors: first and foremost, our personal experience gleaned from many years of trial and error, scientific study and research, and our daily work with athletes of every ability level and from every walk of life. What results is a company philosophy and belief system grounded in three things.

1. We believe in training for the betterment of the body (and mind), not to their detriment.

2. We should learn how to establish, develop, and own quality movement first

3. Each of us is unique. We all have individual natural attributes, goals and dreams, and likes and dislikes.  

My own background is a testament to what I personally believe and what I have lived: I ran my marathon PR of 2:39:37 at Boston on a low weekly average of 45miles of running, with a great deal of supplemental stability and strength training added to the mix.  That being said, there ARE a great many factors that go into what might be the best approach for you.   In today’s podcast, we discuss a variety of factors that might help you determine the best path.

  • Intensity and volume represent an inverse relationship: when one goes up, the other should go down, right?
  • What kind of experience do you have as an athlete? Do you have the requisite aerobic “plumbing” necessary for success as an endurance athlete?
  • If you are imbalanced or moving poorly, will a higher intensity minimalist type training program increase your risk of injury?
  • The scientific evidence is irrefutable: Intensity is the prime driver for improving fitness! But its a risk – reward equation. Is higher intensity worth the increased risk of injury?
  • Does your age matter?
  • Amateur athletes training and racing for fun and to enhance the quality of their lives are generally very busy people with many responsibilities that go beyond “just” training. What impact should this have on how you decide to train?
  • What about YOUR unique tendencies? Do you love to run or ride for hours on end, or is a 1 hour session about your limit?
  • And much more…

We hope you enjoy our podcast on this fun and interesting topic.

~Coach Al

Your Future Self is Depending on You!

 

Pursuit Athletic Performance Functional Wellbeing Coach, Olivia Syptak

Pursuit Athletic Performance Functional Wellbeing Coach, Olivia Syptak

Over the last couple of months, the Pursuit Athletic Performance team has grappled with and explored motivation. Coach Al and members of the team have shared guidance and wisdom on where motivation comes from, how we must cultivate it daily, ways we can harness and channel it, etc.

Last week, I attended a teleconference with research psychologist Tim Pychyl, Ph.D. (pronounced pike-ull), associate professor of psychology at Carlton University in Ottawa, Canada, and author of Solving the Procrastination Puzzle. Interestingly, this session revealed to me a few additional nuggets related to the motivation conundrum. Questions like why we put things off, why we avoid certain tasks or activities that we fully intend to do, and why we do this over and over again, are as much about procrastination as they are about motivation. So thinking about the answers to these questions was, for me, a different way of looking at motivation.

According to Dr. Pychyl, that voice inside that says “I don’t feel like it” or “I don’t want to do it” tends to govern what we choose do because of the gap that exists between our present self and our future self.  Because we don’t have a strong association with our future selves or the pain that our actions today might bring upon them, we act according to that acute, immediate association with the comfort that our present selves stand to gain today.  We fall into the habit of what Pychyl calls “play now, pay later.” That well-worn approach to managing deadlines at work, or with how we approach the stretching component of our training plans are examples. The problem is that when we put stuff off to benefit the present self, our future self bears the consequences. By so often placating that present self, seeker of comfort, gratification, and ease, we are really throwing a wrench in the works for our future self!

So what can we do about it?

Dr. Pychyl highlighted a few helpful strategies. One, quite simply, is to “just get started.” He was careful to point out the important difference between this and Nike’s “Just Do It.” Because we have a tendency “to make tasks more aversive than they are,” thinking about “doing” an entire endeavor could make the whole thing just too big to even contemplate thus perpetuating the very delay we are trying to overcome. The point is we don’t have to take on or finish the whole task! Just starting a task, just getting it going can make a big difference in how we perceive and approach the effort ahead. If you’ve ever not felt like running, but headed out with a commitment to just go for one mile only to find that you return home having completed your whole workout knows exactly why this works.

Another strategy that he highlighted is a mindfulness practice. Developing our ability to be aware of those “I don’t feel like it” emotions that are begging us to take it easy or nudging us ever closer to putting off something that we mean to do, sets us up to intervene and to act rather than to avoid, or as he puts it “giving in to feel good.” This self-regulation capability can be critical to maintaining the link, and dare I say it—the trust, between our present and future selves.

Think about your present self. Think about your future self. Contemplate the space between and how your choices may be narrowing or widening that gap.

In the near term, does your future self expect more quality sleep to allow you to be your best at work and in training? In the longer term, can you picture your future self out on the race course at mile 7 of your Ironman marathon? What does your future self expect from you today to ensure that you’re feeling strong and good at that point? What would your future self tell your present self about the choices you are making today?  What effort can you start on today rather than put off until tomorrow that will lend a hand to your future self? What feelings are you feeling about the tasks you face today that might be limiting your future self? How might your answers to these questions help improve your motivation?

Consider using questions like this to develop a list of intentions for your “selves” to work together on to unlock your potential! Your future self will thank you!

(For more reading on these and similar topics visit Tim Pychyl’s blog “Don’t Delay”)

~Olivia

In Training, Be Purposeful!

“For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.”

–Henri Frederic Amiel, 1821-1881, Swiss Philosopher, Poet, Critic

 

“It is a psychological fact that you can influence your environment and thoughts. If you do so consciously and with high purpose, you can change your habits and attitudes for the better.”

 –source unknown

 “Singleness of purpose is one of the chief essentials for success in life, no matter what may be one’s aim.” 

–John D. Rockefeller, 1839-1937, American Industrialist, Philanthropist, Founder Exxon And last but not least!:

“Be daring, be different, be impractical, be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary.”

 –Sir Cecil Beaton, 1904-1980, British-born American Photographer

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Getting Your Season Started Right!

 

Lis Kenon and Coach Al, Pursuit Athletic Performance

Coach Al with 4x Ironman AG World Champion, Lisbeth Kenyon

Hey Everyone! Coach Al here. :)  If you are like many endurance athletes in the northern hemisphere, the late March marks the time when you really start planning to “get serious” with training and race preparation in anticipation of the upcoming competitive season. Even more, for some athletes this time period marks the time when, after a casual glance at the calendar reveals only a few weeks remain until the first event, a state of shock and absolute panic ensues! ☺

Before you panic and start hammering those high intensity intervals, moving yourself precariously close to either injury or over-training, remember to keep a few important things in mind as you embark upon a fast-track toward improved race readiness.

First, avoid the trap of thinking there is a quick fix, short cut, or easy path toward a true higher level of fitness. Building the stamina and strength that leads to success in endurance sports takes time and patience. However, if you pay close attention to the fundamentals such as skill and technique enhancement and general/functional strength, you CAN make some great inroads over a relatively short period of time that WILL help get you closer to being able to achieve your goals.

Secondly, while there are many facets of your training that will be integral for your success, there are two topics requiring your attention all year long but often don’t get the attention they deserve this time of year.  They are: maximizing your daily NUTRITION and daily RECOVERY from training.  (If you’re at a point in time when you feel you need a “kick-start” to cleaning up your diet, check out our De-tox!)

It goes without saying that if you don’t eat well most of the time and at the right times and don’t recover adequately between individual training sessions and week to week, your training, fitness, and ultimately your race preparation will stagnate or even worsen.

Here are three TIPS to assist in transitioning optimally to the month of April and also help you get your season started right:

  1. Review your current Limiters and then establish some Training Objectives to improve and overcome those Limiters. Limiters are your weaknesses or “race specific” abilities that may hold you back from being successful in your most important events.   Likewise, Training Objectives are measurable training goals that you set for yourself and which may be based on your Limiters, with the goal of improving upon them.

To help in this process, start by asking yourself these questions: 

  • As you review your current Limiters, how well have you progressed in the Off-Season in addressing those?
  • Did you “miss anything” in your Off-Season preparation that you should focus on now?
  • Is there a chance that your Limiters will hold you back from being successful in certain events?
  • Are you aware of your strengths and weaknesses?
  • Are you doing anything right now to improve your Limiters and thus your chance for success in your upcoming KEY races?

Even though it IS late March, it is NOT too late to start developing some key workouts to help strengthen your weaknesses. Be patient and persistent, and set measurable goals (training objectives) so that when you line up for your most important event this season, you will have the confidence of knowing you did all you could to prepare for success!

  1. Focus on executing KEY WORKOUTS by differentiating intensity and being purposeful in all of your training: To ensure you continue to improve, one of your primary goals must be to execute key-workouts to the best of your ability, which are those workouts that when recovered from them, will have had a specific and material impact on your race specific fitness.  Avoid falling victim to the “rat race” mentality that has you chronically “running” from one workout to the next without any real focus, which only results in tiredness and higher levels of stress without resulting in improved health OR fitness.
  2. Eat as well as you can, most of the time: Eating the best foods to nurture your health and recovery, most of the time and at the right times, is the best path toward optimizing health and body composition. Too often endurance athletes fall victim to waiting until they are close to their goal races and then trying to get lean and “race ready.” Once you begin to do higher intensity race-specific training sessions, your body will be under greater duress – trying to limit calories at that time can be very stressful and may lead to injury, poor adaptation to training stresses, and basically undoing all of the work you are doing to improve!

To summarize, these three tips come back to one very important but often forgotten concept: listening to your body and trusting your intuition.  I believe your intuition may be the most important tool you have in your toolbox as an endurance athlete, and unfortunately many of us don’t listen to it when we need to the most.

If you are a novice, your intuition might not be as highly developed as your more experienced training partners or friends, but it IS there and is often talking to you! Your “inner voice” might be telling you that you are tired and just don’t feel up to that ride or run that you had planned, or, that what you are eating isn’t optimal to support your training or health.

Your body is smart! If you learn to really listen to it and stay patient and focused on the fundamentals, you will get your season started right and perhaps have your best season ever! Best of luck!

~Coach Al

031: Intensity Metric Triangulation with Coach Will Kirousis [Podcast]

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Coach Will Kirousis

Coach Will Kirousis

Today I’m joined by coach Will Kirousis of Tri-Hard Endurance Sports Coaching to discuss a variety of training related topics.  I’ve known Will for many years and know him, along with his partner Jason Gootman, as among the finest coaches in the business.

In today’s podcast, we discuss the concept of Intensity Metric Triangulation, which is simply an approach that helps to empower athletes to better understand what their power meter, pace meter, heart rate monitor and perceived exertion level are combining to say to them.

Taken further, and most importantly, Intensity Metric Triangulation helps athletes understand how to adjust and perhaps modify how they are executing a training session based on the feedback they are receiving, both objectively from the training tools they might be employing, as well as subjectively from the information their body is sending to them.  In a nutshell, Intensity Metric Triangulation is a simple to use system that helps the athlete know better what’s happening inside in their body and how they might want to adjust training as it evolves.

Will and I also have some fun discussing a variety of concepts that I know will be helpful to consider for any endurance athlete, from communication and self awareness to logging training data to understanding the value of each of our own unique personal histories.  These are key players in our ability to train smart.

One last thing: JOIN Will and I at TRI-MANIA Boston Summit and Expo on March 29, 2014. All information and details can be found here: http://www.tri-mania.com/Boston.htm.  Among many other great speakers, clinics and vendors, Will and his partner Jason Gootman will present a seminar on this topic, Intensity Metric Triangulation at 10:00 AM. I am presenting a seminar at 3:30 PM entitled “Lessons From The Gait Lab.”  Its going to be a great day all around. We hope to see you there!

~Coach Al

017: 70x Ironman With 30 Straight in Kona: Ken Glah (Podcast)

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Hi Everyone!

Ken Glah

70x Ironman Finisher with 30 Straight Kona’s, Ken Glah. He also the owner of Endurance Sports Travel.

In the sport of triathlon, the name Ken Glah is synonymous with class and endurance. A humble guy from eastern Pennsylvania who has mixed it up with the best in the world on the race course, he’s competed in more than 70 Ironman races and finished his 30th Kona in a row this past October. An extraordinary achievement!

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Ken for this podcast in which he shares his insights and tips on:

  • What he has learned in 30 years of training, traveling, and racing in the sport
  • How he has been able to essentially remain injury free, despite very high training volume
  • How he feels athletes should train to maximize their chances for success in Ironman racing
  • What his favorite race destinations are and why

Ken also talks about his unique business, Endurance Sports Travel, which is, essentially, a concierge service for the traveling long course triathlete looking for top notch service and support. He explains many of the unique services he offers, and how he might help you enjoy your race travel more and with less stress.

Few athletes and business owners have a better handle on how to maximize success in our sport. We hope you enjoy our talk. Thanks Ken!

We hope you enjoy our podcasts and find them useful for your training and racing. Any questions? Hit us up in the comments, or on Facebook. Let us know of any topics you would like us to cover too.

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Watch! This “Strong” Ironman Likely to be Walking the Marathon (Video)

Hey Everyone!
We have a quick, yet important video for you to watch. In it, an Ironman athlete completes a 100 lb. clean and jerk in an effort to work on her strength program as she prepares for Ironman Florida. As you know from reading our stuff, strength, coupled with appropriate mobility, stability, and flexibility, is CRUCIAL to optimizing your full potential as a triathlete. So she’s doing all the correct things, right?

Sorry to say, in this case, not at all.

The are huge problems with what she’s doing, and we’d like to walk you through it.

Instead of creating true FUNCTIONAL STRENGTH, the dangerous, incorrect form she demonstrates in this lift is completely counterproductive to her goals.

When doing competitive Olympic lifting, the goal is to get the barbell over your head no matter what. In that kind of competition, judges don’t necessarily care how you get the weight there, or if you blow out your knees or your back doing it.

However, when it comes to performing better as a triathlete, rather than brute strength, what you need to create is true FUNCTIONAL STRENGTH–the kind of strength that will allow you to RUN the marathon distance in an Ironman and finish strong without the wheels coming off. In training functional strength effectively, it’s not IF you get the barbell over your head that matters, but HOW you do it. 

Let’s dissect this example, and focus primarily on the what’s happening at the knee.

When this athlete prepares to clean the weight and move it over head, note the dangerous collapse of the knees inward toward the mid-line. Even though she seems strong on the surface, this inward collapse indicates a lack of adequate and integrated glute and hip strength, and overall core stability and strength. The collapse of her knee under load is not only damaging for her knees, it is TRAINING HER NERVOUS SYSTEM to make that motor pathway a HABIT. That neurological habit is being deeply grooved with every repetition, and will be reproduced any time the knee is under load, and that, of course, includes running.

Over time, with repeated patterns like this, the knee will become damaged, with the risk of serious injury rising steadily.

As a hinge joint, the knee is a slave to everything that happens above and below it.  It is not designed to move sideways under load. Move it sideways toward your mid-line too many times, especially under load, and you’ll get a worn out meniscus, torn cartilage–and much slower running too. In effect, knee collapse during strength training actually teaches the body to do the same when running. The result is exactly the opposite of the desired goal–to have strength training help her to be better on the race course. This athlete is less efficient and absolutely leaking run speed, and she is surely inviting hip and knee pain and injury.

In addition to knee problems, continuing the mechanics this athlete is using in this video also puts her at great risk for a  litany of problems including:

  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS)
  • Hip and glute pain
  • ACL and meniscus injury
  • Patellofemoral problems
  • Arthritis

The fact is, when it comes to racing Ironman, it doesn’t matter if this athlete has an aerobic engine the size of Chrissie Wellington’s. With mechanics like that, the odds are increased that she may have to walk at some point in the marathon. Why?

Let’s start with the fact that running a mile is the equivalent of approximately 1500 one-leg squat jumps.  That adds up to over 19,000 inward collapses of a single knee during the course of the marathon. Each time the knee moves inward with each foot strike, energy is being lost, and stress is being placed on other tissues to attempt to control or compensate. The “slower” running results from energy leak, much like running in sand or on ice. The repetitive inward movement for thousands of reps results in more pain with each successive foot-strike.

The thing about this that is most distressing to us, is the fact that this athlete–like many of YOU–has the best of intentions, yet is misguided. She understands that strength is important to compete well, and she obviously works hard at it. Brute force and a determination to “be strong,” are not enough, however. It is not about showing that you can forcefully move a weight and get it over head. In the end, it’s ALL about training your nervous system to control your muscles to work with PERFECT FORM when under load, and as fatigue mounts, mile after mile.

Helping YOU to BE GREAT!

Coach Al and Kurt

Join our Online Triathlon Team. Race as you never have before!

 

 

Ironman AG World Champion Lisbeth Kenyon: What We All Can Learn From Her

Lisbeth Kenyon, Ironman World Champion

Lisbeth Kenyon, Ironman World Champion, W 45-49. 10:03:26

As some of you know by now, one of the athletes I coach, Lisbeth Kenyon, again won her age group title in the Ironman World Championship yesterday in Kona in a time of 10:03:26. I could not be happier for this extraordinary woman, friend, and competitor. The word “congratulations” hardly seems tribute enough.

In many ways, Lisbeth’s win is beyond amazing, and is a reflection of a ton of work this season. And I will tell you this…everything that has happened over the past year—including a painful bout of shingles in the past month, and the fact that she has three growing kids that keep her incredibly busy—is a testament to the relentless work she did to again become the champion she is. The best in the world in her age group.

I also want to share this with all of you….

Everything emphasized with Lisbeth in her training—from when we started in earnest in January, right Lis Kenon and Coach Al, Pursuit Athletic Performancethrough her race day—reflects what we do with EVERY athlete who trains with the Pursuit Athletic Performance team.

 You want to know what made the difference for Lis this year? It’s this….

 Yesterday she raced with:

  • Better balance
  • Appropriate and improved flexibility
  • Stronger hips and glutes
  • A clear race nutrition strategy
  • A clear race execution strategy

She did all the work in training to get there, and she executed a near perfect race. 

Lisbeth, truly, is a living example of what can be accomplished when an athlete follows the whole-athlete, integrated training we lay out for ALL competitors who train with us.

ANY ONE OF YOU—at ANY LEVEL—can replicate what Lisbeth did to get to YOUR optimal result.

No, not everyone has the innate talent of a world champion athlete, but that does not matter. You simply need the ability to learn the TRUTH about what works in training, act on it, be willing to let go of counterproductive methodologies, and DO THE WORK. It’s as simple as that for your greatness and success to be realized.

Congratulations again to Lisbeth! And may all of you uncover the champion within.

Be Great!

Coach Al

P.S.–Mid-Ironman, Lisbeth got tossed over her handlebars and off of her bike at an aid station, landing on her back! She brushed it off, got back to her race execution strategy, and got down to business. The mark of a true champion!