Archive for Race Nutrition

Are You Addicted To Sugar?

Americans on average consume an incredible amount of sugar.  Studies suggest that the average person consumes over 130 pounds of added sugar (much of it hidden) annually!  Believe it or not, the average endurance athlete isn’t any different when it comes to eating (and relying upon) too much sugar. Yes, it is true that sugar stored as glycogen in your muscles is your body’s preferred first source of fuel for training and racing. And yes, that stored glycogen also DOES fuel higher intensity efforts comparatively speaking.  However, if you want to go FASTER over LONGER distances, while being LEANER and HEALTHIER, your ultimate preferred fuel should be STORED BODY FAT, not sugar. Before you can become that lean and mean, superb fat burning machine you want to be, you need to first reduce how much sugar you’re eating on a daily basis. It really is that simple. The million dollar question becomes, how do you GET OFF the sugar drip, and TURN ON fat burning? Let’s start with some questions first. Do any of these sound familiar?

  • Are you “hungry” first thing in the morning when you wake? (You shouldn’t necessarily be hungry upon wakening, but if you ate late or eat too much sugar, you are sure to wake feeling hungry!)
  • Do you experience cravings throughout the day for sugary foods (or mood swings)?  (A craving isn’t true hunger!)
  • Do you have a hard time stopping once you start eating sweets?
  • Do you find yourself needing something sweet as a “pick me up” during the day? (Blood sugar fluctuations mean your energy ebbs and flows, up and down. The need for a “pick me up” is common as a result).
  • Do you find you need some “calories” during training if you’ve been out for an hour or more? (True endurance is defined as your body’s ability to burn fat as a fuel. You ought to be able to exercise at a moderate intensity for many hours before “needing” additional calories!)

If you answered yes to any of these, you are NOT alone. If you want to get LEANER and stay HEALTHIER (and who doesn’t?), and become a BETTER fat burner, there are two things you MUST do:

1. Get off the sugar drip now: Your health AND your performance would greatly benefit from a firm commitment to completely QUIT sugar for at least two weeks (if not more).  It isn’t just the processed foods containing sugar (soda for example), it is also those natural forms of sugar (honey and maple syrup as an example), as well as all starches which are easily and rapidly converted into sugar.

2. Train to burn fat, not sugar: master your endurance nutrition: Learning how to become a better FAT burner isn’t JUST about reducing your intake of sugar. How you approach your training nutrition and training also plays a role.

To learn what steps you need to take, watch our very popular Spreecast (webinar) called Master Your Endurance Nutrition, where we teach you step by step, everything you need to train better, blast bodyfat and improve your true endurance.

Also, consider our 14-day detox program: The easiest path to getting OFF the sugar drip is to have the nutritional and motivational support we provide with our own 14-day Detox program! Back by popular demand, this unique program from Designs for Health, has been hugely successful for hundreds of athletes just like you! We’re launching it on the 29th.

NOW IS THE TIME to make the changes you need, to be better than ever.

Listen, we all have a love/hate relationship with sugar.  What most people don’t know is that human beings are hard wired (evolution) to eat it.  After all, while sugary foods were in short supply and hard to come by at one time (picture yourself foraging through impossibly thick brush to get some berries or climbing a tree to get to a bee’s nest), sugar is now obviously easily accessible and ubiquitous. Detoxing from sugar and adopting a long-term, low-sugar lifestyle isn’t just important to get leaner and go further and faster, it’s absolutely essential to prevent chronic disease and stay healthy. A high sugar diet…

  • Makes you fat.
  • Promotes inflammation throughout the body.
  • Is closely correlated with every single chronic disease.
  • Speeds up the aging process.
  • Increases your risk of cancer and heart disease.
  • Limits your true endurance and speed.

If you want to be faster, stronger, leaner and feel younger, you need to get OFF the sugar drip right now.   Get in touch if we can help in any way. And don’t forget our detox program, which could be just the thing you need to break old bad habits and make the permanent changes that will set you on the path that will make 2015 and beyond, the best years of your life!

~Coach Al 

Ps:

How about a DETOX BONUS!? **The first 10 people who read this and sign up for our detox  will get a FREE 20 minute consultation with me, Coach Al, to discuss any training or nutrition related topic they would like! SIGN UP NOW, and get YOUR FREE consult!  Let’s talk training and nutrition!

How to get this special bonus? Easy! 1. Sign up for the detox! 2. Send me an email at info@pursuitathleticperformance.com.  If you’re among the first 10, we’ll schedule our appointment!

DETOX DOUBLE BONUS: **Any one who reads this and sends me an email, we will send you a LINK to our special spreecast entitled LOW CARB, HIGH FAT FUELING: A Better Way?  We did this webinar for our team – it can be yours to view NOW.  Just email!

050: An Interview With Dr. Tamara Hew-Butler, D.P.M., Ph.D. [Podcast]

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Dr. Tamera Hew

Tamera Hew-Butler D.P.M., Ph.D.

Hi Everyone! Today I am honored and pleased to welcome Dr. Tamara Hew-Butler as a guest on our podcast. Let me say this right up front: In my opinion, this is a MUST LISTEN podcast for every endurance athlete who has ever wondered what the science really says about hydration and sodium/salt intake during exercise. What a fitting way to celebrate our 50th episode! :)

An award winning assistant professor of Exercise Science in the School of Health Sciences at Oakland University, Dr. Hew is recognized around the world as an expert researcher and scientist. A runner who enjoys training and competing, she has authored 50 scientific papers in such peer-reviewed journals as the Journal of Neuroscience, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, and Sports Medicine, among others.  A bonus for us, is that Dr. Hew is a really nice, down-to-earth science “geek” (her words), who truly enjoys sharing what she knows with others, and as she puts it, “helping her family of runners” around the globe.

I had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Hew present at the “Medicine and Science in Ultra Endurance Sports” conference on June 24th in Squaw Valley, CA., in the week leading up to the Western States 100 Endurance Run. In the conference Dr. Hew presented on the “Spectrum of Exercise Associated Hyponetremia.”  

In this podcast, we enjoyed discussing so many things very important to every athlete. Whether you’re a runner doing an occasional 5k or marathon, or a triathlete doing multiple ironman distance events, or an ultra runner training for 50mile up to 100mile events, you will WANT TO TUNE in to this podcast to hear what Dr. Hew has to say.

Among the topics and questions we discuss are:

  • Hyponetremia: What is it and what are the risk factors (exercise induced) to be aware of?
  • Dehydration: What does it mean to be dehydrated? What can I do to ensure I don’t become either dehydrated or OVER hydrated during exercise?
  • What is the role of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) / arginine vasopressin (AVP) during exericse and how does that impact how much we should drink?
  • Sodium balance and salt intake during extreme exercise: Do you need to take in salt/sodium during long events? If so, how much and how would you know?
  • Some companies looking to sell their products espouse the importance of the perfect electrolyte blend: Does such a thing exist? Do you really need a “balanced spectrum” of electrolyes during extreme exercise or is sodium alone adequate?
  • How reliable are our own body’s signals to either drink OR take in salt, when we’re training and racing?
  • What does it mean when we feel the desire or need to urinate during exercise? Is peeing a reliable indicator of hydration or electrolyte status?
  • And much more, including briefly touching on protein intake during exercise.

There are so many companies marketing to us and so much anecdotal evidence and personal opinion from internet experts. It is refreshing to hear a true expert share her thoughts on these topics, gleaned from many years of study, research, and experience.

I’d like to convey my sincerest thanks to Dr. Hew for joining me today. I know you will learn a great deal from listening, so tune in and enjoy! Happy Trails!

~Coach Al 

042: Interview with Pursuit Ultra-Runner Debbie Livingston [Podcast]

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Ultra-runner, mom, wife, and coach extraordinaire, Debbie Livingston

Ultra-runner, mom, wife, and coach extraordinaire, Debbie Livingston

Hi Everyone. Coach Al here.  Today I’m thrilled to share an interview I did with elite ultra-runner Debbie Livingston. Debbie and I have worked together for a few years as coach/athlete. She’s well known in local circles as an elite ultra-runner, yoga and pilates teacher, personal trainer, and even as a race director (the Soapstone Mountain trail race sponsored by the Shenipset Striders).

Debbie combines her love of running and racing at a very high level on the trail, with her various roles including mom, wife, citizen, and also as one of our newly appointed coaches here at Pursuit Athletic Performance. We are super excited to have her on board, as she has so much to offer and share with others.

In today’s podcast, we get into all manner of topics that we know you’ll find interesting.

  • Debbie’s racing season – what she’s done to this point (overall wins at Traprock and Peak 50!), as well as what is coming up (Tahoe Rim Trail 100 in July, among others).
  • Debbie’s year long journey to find just the right race fuel balance – what she’s tried and how it has come together for her.
  • Her experience with our Comprehensive Metabolic Profile and how learning about her unique issues with dysbiosis and certain food allergies allowed her to heal her gut and improve her overall health AND performance.  (If you missed episode #9 of our podcast, where we discuss the Comprehensive Metabolic Profile in detail, you can listen to it here.)
  • How her movement/strength training is progressing and how she considers this an essential component to her success at the ultra-distance.
  • Her new role as a coach with Team Pursuit Athletic Performance – what caused her to say “yes” to coaching, and what the future holds for her with our team.
  • Her trip out to the Western States 100 next week to help support and pace one of her friends, competitor Larrisa Dannis, as she competes in Western States.  (I’ll be out there as well, first to attend the “Medicine and Science in Ultra-Endurance Sports” Conference, and then to volunteer on race day. Really excited!)
  • And much more!

Thank you Debbie for joining me. I had a blast chatting with you!  I’m looking forward to seeing you out in Squaw Valley!

~Coach Al 

033: Food: Facts and Falacies [Podcast]

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Pollen quoteWith every passing day, it seems there is a new research study, article from an “expert,” or training partner, telling us we HAVE to eat more of this food or that food, or avoid some kind of food altogether.  The old saying about the pendulum swinging from one extreme to another sure applies when it comes to modern day eating and nutrition. (Many of those “experts” are trying to get you to buy something from them, which doesn’t help!)  

As an athlete, you are probably even more confused trying to figure out the best way to “fuel” for optimal training and racing.  Should you go high-carb low-fat, low-carb high-fat, paleo, vegan, or some mix of all of these? Is there a “secret” food or fuel that will propel you to faster racing and a PR? So many questions, and lots of confusion!  

Our view on eating here at Pursuit Athletic Performance is simple:

We believe a daily diet that leads to optimal health, longevity, and fast racing, is largely about BALANCE and MODERATION, and should be comprised mostly of a variety of whole foods, very few if any processed foods, foods balanced in macro-nutrients, plenty of rich sources of fat (especially good fat), and foods lower on the glycemic index. This quote says it all: “Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food!” There’s a lot of truth to that!


The best way for each of us to eat is largely personal. We all need to find what will work best for us individually. Some do better on higher carbohydrate diets and others feel better on lower carbohydrate diets. If there IS one recommendation we could stand firm on, it is that good daily eating starts with removing unwanted sugar, processed junk foods, and artificial stimulants from our diet, not by adding more stuff, particularly junk.

Eating Well: Our friends at Tri-Hard Sports Conditioning wrote a great article entitled “Eating Well.”  In that piece, they shared these thoughts:  “When was the last time you really enjoyed eating? Do you often rush through meals so you can get to the next thing? Are you preoccupied with whether a food is good for you or not? It’s time to bring the fun back into eating and we’re here to help. Picture this. You’re at the counter chopping up some fresh vegetables you picked up a few days before at your local farmers’ market. Your best friend is rubbing some spices on a few pieces of fish. You can smell the grill heating up as you listen to your favorite music. You share great conversation as you prepare and soon sit down to this delicious meal. You enjoy every bite and feel nourished by the experience. This is eating well! This is in contrast to grabbing something on your way out the door or obsessing over every detail of nutrition. Eating well is a concept that blends “good nutrition” with the simple act of eating great meals with your family and friends. Eating well empowers you to get past means-to-end thinking and returns eating to its rightful place as one of life’s simple pleasures. Rest assured, when you eat well you get all of the benefits of “good nutrition”, and even more, since you are free of the food neuroses that make eating stressful and spoil the fun.”  That’s great advice, don’t you think?  So, in summary, here are some general bullets to guide you.

  • Eat real food, not processed food.
  • Eat amounts appropriate given your training volume and intensity.
  • Avoid seeing food as stress relief or a way to cope emotionally.
  • Everything in moderation.
  • Experiment, keep an open mind, and learn.
  • When it comes to meal timing, experiment to find what works best for you.
  • Keep a diary to learn more about your habits.
  • Begin hydrating when you first wake up by drinking at least 1 full glass of water.
  • Drink as much water as you can reasonably stomach before going to bed.
  • Make good food choices as often as possible, vs. avoiding certain foods.
  • Be flexible each day, and don’t beat yourself up if you make an occasional poor choice.
  • Get the majority of your nutrition from fresh vegetables, whole fruits, and quality lean protein.
  • Limit starch and sugar intake to those time periods during and /or immediately after long rides and runs.
  • Consume a minimum of 3-4 grams a day of Omega-3 fats from fatty fish or a quality supplement.

We hope our chat today on the podcast about all things food and falacies, is helpful. Have a great day everyone and enjoy eating well!

~Coach Al and Dr. Kurt

024: Race Day Nutrition: Plan A Fueling Strategy NOW (Podcast)

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Hi Everyone!

race day nutritionA little early in the year to talk race day nutrition? We don’t think so.  The time to begin planning a fueling strategy is NOW, and in this podcast we review the many facets of how and why.

We walk you through the following:

      • Is there a perfect recipe for training and racing nutrition?
      • Which fueling products are best?
      • Can gut dysbiosis have an impact on general nutrition and/or race day results?
      • How many calories per hour?
      • Liquids vs. solids?
      • Impact of intensity and temperature?
      • What are some guidelines athletes can use in developing a fueling strategy?

 

We also talk about the essential importance of teaching your body to burn fat as a primary source of fuel. This is a fundamentally important baseline to establish, and we review specific strategies to make this happen that stretch right into your daily nutrition.

We love to talk this stuff! Questions? Fire them up!

Coach Al and Kurt

As a thank you for listening, if you would like to go deeper into this topic, you can sign up below for our webinar “Smart Training and Racing Nutrition.” It fleshes out in depth all the topics we cover in the podcast. Enjoy!

Day-Before-the-Race Carbo Load Strategy

Hello All!

Coach Al Lyman, gait analysis and functional movement expert, Pursuit Athletic Performance

Coach Al Lyman, CSCS, FMS, HKC

Coach Al here. With race season underway, I thought I’d check in with my recommendation on carbo loading. I’ll start by saying I’m not a fan of the traditional protocols that prescribe a depletion phase followed by a loading phase. That approach has not been been shown to be superior to maintaining or supplementing carb intake without depleting your body.

That being said, there is some good research showing that a “day-before-the-race” strategy–where you REALLY load carbs–can truly help ensure full glycogen saturation. If you’re racing half or full Ironman, or have a long road race, please consider the strategy outlined below.

Plan on a day-before-the-race carbo supplementation regime that includes from 7, up to 10g of carbohydrates, per kg of body weight.

This is more than most of you are used to, that’s for sure! I’m sure it flies in the face of how most of you prefer to eat normally. But, it is especially important to ensure complete and full glycogen saturation prior to race day, and this approach goes a long way to making that happen.

Here’s how you do it, using myself as an example:

I weigh about 160lbs. Taking 10g per kg of bodyweight (70kg), I’d look to ingest ~700g of carbs. Translation, 2800 calories of carbohydrates!

Obviously, I do not recommend you eat 10 bagels to get that amount!!!! You will want and need to use an easily-assimilated liquid carb source in addition to solid foods. And you may want to start that ingestion saturation up to 36 hours beforehand to spread it out a bit more.

What to use? Any of the Hammer long-chain fuels such as Sustained Energy or Perpetuem would work excellently as a way to get in those extra carbs without GI distress. Carbo-Pro is also another fine choice.

I recommend you give this loading strategy a try. If you have a long weekend session coming up, that is a perfect time to test and see how it works for you. Keep in mind that in my example I aim for the higher 10g amount. When crunching these numbers, 7g per kg might be a bit more more reasonable for many athletes–and easier to achieve.

Carbo loading certainly does make a difference in energy levels on race day, especially late in the competition.

Questions? Fire away!