Archive for Classes and Clinics for Athletes

Who Wouldn’t Like To Run Faster Off Of The Bike?

 

"The truth isn't always popular, but it's always the truth."  - unknown


I've got some important (and very different) stuff to share with you today, and I know, because you're busy you may not want to stop what you're doing to read this.

But listen, if you want to KNOW how you can train differently and smarter on the bike, AND learn how to run FASTER off of it (no it isn't about the same old blah blah, brick runs, etc.), then ya gotta keep reading!

Trust me, my advice is NOT going to be the same-old, same-old. It will probably rankle a few folks, too. Especially some of the "experts" out there that are reading.So to get to the heart of what I want to share today, I have to start with a story about swimming. It's a true story.

(I know, I know...I said I was going to help you ride and run faster, and I am!  But...you need a little context - and this story will provide it. Keep reading!)

A few years ago I was sitting around with some swim coaches at an ASCA conference. The topics at the table revolved around two things: the iconic swim coach, James "Doc" Counsilman (who is well known for coaching Mark Spitz, winner of 7 golds at the 72 Olympics), and the "S" curve in swimming. 

Now, I don't know if you're a swimmer or not, but if you are, I'm sure you're familiar with the "S" curve pulling path. This "S" curve is what many coaches believe is the "ideal path" for your hand to follow during the pull phase of the stroke.  Shaped like the letter S, this pulling path has become well known as one hallmark of a fast swimmer.

Apparently all the hoopla about this "S" curve began with Counsilman and Spitz. The story goes, the coach was watching Spitz swim and noticed this "S" curve in his stroke. Since Spitz was swimming faster than anyone else in the world, Counsilman (always the innovator), came to the conclusion that the secret to his speed might be this curve. 

So Counsilman figured, if it was good enough for Spitz, it should be good enough for everyone, and proceeded to instruct every swimmer he coached to start putting this "S" curve into their strokes. What began as a simple way to make his swimmers faster, soon became gospel in the swimming world.

Simply put, many believed that to swim fast, you needed to have an "S" curve in your pull.

 

Which came first, the chicken or the egg?  

What I'm talking about here is CAUSE and EFFECT, so the chicken/egg analogy may not really work. But it is sort of a funny cartoon, don't you think?  🙂

Anyway, an odd thing happened as Counsilman's swimmers started adding this "S" curve consciously - something he didn't anticipate.

Despite imploring his swimmers to "S" more, not only did most of them not get any faster, some actually started swimming slower.

What was going on?

To answer that question, let's go back to Spitz for a moment.

Is it possible that the "S" curve emerged as a natural byproduct of both his training and his body's intuitive understanding of how best to create more lift (and thus increase pulling power)?

Based on my own experience, I'd have to say the answer is an absolute, YES.

Spitz, like most great swimmers, could "grip" and hold on to the water, making the water more "solid" as his arm traveled past his rotating body.

He didn't consciously try to create that letter S.

It happened as a function of what his body did naturally, AND what he learned via tens of thousands of hours of mindful, consistent swimming.
  

Should you scrape mud off of your cycling shoes?   

I'm betting a very similar kind of story could be told when it comes to riding a bike efficiently and powerfully.  And THEN..running efficiently AND fast after the ride.

How so you ask?

Have you heard that popular advice, made famous by legendary cyclist Greg Lemond, to "pedal like you're scraping mud off of the bottom of your shoe"?

Like Counsilman's advice to articially integrate an "S" curve, trying to artificially change how you pedal a bike is not going to help you, and it may even HURT you.

And that "hurt" might not be limited to riding, but could also negatively impact how you run OFF of the bike. And increase your risk of injury, too.

In fact, I'm here to tell you that for the most part, ANY drill, tool, or technique that you've read about or heard was designed to improve your pedaling technique, is probably a complete waste of your time. 

How about Spin-Scan on a Computrainer? Or those fancy charts that show you exactly where you should apply pressure to the pedal as you go around? All of it, a waste of your time.

...except for one, that is.

One, very different and important, approach.

That one approach is the topic of a 12-minute video I prepared for you, that you've GOT to watch.

Authentic Cycling Video is here.So when it comes to riding faster,

I have to ask...Do the best cyclists have a great "spin" because they consciously "scrape mud" at the bottom of the pedal stroke?

Or (like Spitz in the water), are their pedal strokes and nervous systems more finely tuned and coordinated because of natural ability and perhaps more importantly, thousands of hours in the saddle?

Whenever we start incorporating something into our training because we heard the pros do it, or our friends said they read it in a book or online in a forum, OR we think we can outsmart our nervous system with "better" technology (such as clipless pedal systems), bad things can happen.

That was true for Counsilman's swimmers, it is true despite LeMond's advice, and it's true for running and just about every other activity, too.

There are a few other "truisms" that can be gleaned from all of this, such as...

  • getting faster isn't just about training "hard," it has a lot more to do with our nervous system than most realize.
  • mountain bikers, I think, have known a lot of this for a while. They 'get it.'
  • all of us are learning more every day - no one has all of the answers.

As for how ALL of this specifically impacts YOUR running off of the bike...well you'll have to watch and listen to the video for the answer to that.

When you do, please let me know what you think, ok?

Happy trails!
~Coach Al 

PS: A few minutes into the video, I refer to an article I wrote for Active.com, called: What Kenyans Can Teach Us About Running Economy and Efficiency.  To read it, CLICK HERE.

PSS: Just so y'all know, I have tremendous respect and admiration for Greg Lemond, a true champion and legendary cyclist. My belief is that at one time, he probably made an observation and drew a conclusion from it.  I've done that many times and am always learning. I've also changed my mind on things as a result of having a better understanding of "cause and effect" with certain things.

Today It’s About THE SWIM! You In?

 

I'm sure you gathered from the subject line that the topic today is swimming, specifically for triathletes. If you're a triathlete and the subject interests you, cool, keep reading. If not, no worries we'll connect next time around.

So, I've been chatting a bit recently about swimming and getting faster, with a lady I've coached for, um, about 6 years. She's smart and experienced, and pretty darn "good," if you consider being a course record holder AND winning your age-group at the Ironman World Championships in Kona FOUR times, good. 🙂

Our conversation, which included a little friendly bantering, got me thinking...

...Most triathletes struggle to get faster in the water. The question is, why?

 

There are a lot of options and a ton of information available online if a triathlete wants to become a faster swimmer. The problem is, non of the "experts" agree on the best approach. Read enough and you'll hear the secret is the right drill, until you read the article that says drilling is a waste of time.

The volume debate always gets the conversation heated up! Swim more? Swim less? Swim with a band and paddles or no, get rid of the "toys" if you want to improve. There's just not much agreement. Not coincidently, there's also a healthy debate right now in a slew of online forums and among coaches on the topic.

While I haven't counted, it seems to me there's enough websites, coaches, clinics, swim programs, instructional DVDs, AND opinions....to fill a very large ocean (no pun intended). 🙂

So if it's not a lack of information, resources, or expert opinions, then what's the real reason for such widespread struggle?

Something is clearly missing.

Well-known tri-coach Joel Filliol, in an article entitled "The Top 20 Rules For Faster Triathlon Swimming," and on a recent podcast episode he did with coach Paulo Sousa, makes the argument that triathletes waste time drilling...that drilling doesn't work. According to them both, conditioning trumps technique. To quote Sousa, "working on your fitness works on technique," while the "opposite is not true."

A slightly different viewpoint comes from internationally-renowned swim coach and triathlete (and one of my own mentors), Haydn Wooley of Future Dreams Swimming in New Zealand, who is well known for stating that "technique sets the upper limit to how far your fitness will take you."

After literally beginning my own swimming journey by learning to overcome a fear of the water and taking my first swimming lesson as a 36 year old, 20 years ago, I've come to discover there are a lot ways to skin a cat, or to put it the way a Swede would, "Alla sätt är bra utom de dåliga" which means... "all methods are good except the bad ones."  🙂

So let me ask: If you want to get faster, should you attend a clinic or get your hands on an instructional DVD and start drilling in an effort to improve your skills? OR, should you simply increase your volume and frequency, just swim your ass off, and just tweak your stroke as you go?

 

Duh! We're all different.  

 

Triathletes the world over come from so many different backgrounds. It's always seemed somewhat counterintuitive to me to think that any ONE approach is the right one for every triathlete. 

Hell...there's some percentage of those who line up at the starting line of a triathlon who are so freaked out about being in the open water, thoughts of anything except how to survive and cope with the panic, are completely forgotten. (Who gives a crap about technique when you're nearly drowning!) 🙂

So what do you think?

For me and the athletes I work with, we begin with this simple mantra: Commit to never taking another bad stroke. 

Of course, you and I know that making sure every stroke we take is absolutely "perfect," just isn't possible, right?

 

How we learn: experimentation, repetition, imagery, exaggeration 

When it comes to learning a new skill or trying to improve upon our existing skills, all of the current science says that for most of us, experimenting - dancing on the edge of our abilities, going "too" far and slipping and falling only to get back up and try again, are universal concepts that hold true.

"Chunking" skills into small bits, seeing a picture or image in your mind's eye of how a skill should ideally be performed and then trying to replicate it, and even exaggerating the opposite of what you're trying to do, also seem to have merit.

We also know that grooving a skill is easy, but changing that groove is hard. Really hard.

 

Which is why it's SO difficult to change after having taken thousands (millions?) of, shall we say, less than "perfect" strokes.

 

Conditioning or technique, which is more important?  

 

Coaches Filliol and Sousa have a point: There's very little chance a triathlete looking to get faster is going to achieve it by mindlessly practicing and "perfecting" drills. Clinics too, are often a big waste of time, without the essential followup work, repetition, and effort required to change.

And while I wouldn't agree completely with Sousa and his belief that conditioning trumps technique, a lack of "enough" conditioning to practice effectively hurts many triathletes who are trying to get faster. Why? Fatigue erodes our ability to concentrate and hold on to good form.

 

Can you "change" in a single practice session?

 

The images on the left are from a 1 on 1 coaching session I did with a woman I coach. She made some dramatic improvements in a very short period of time, as you can clearly see when comparing the "before" clip on the left, with the "after" clip on the right.

In the image on the left, she is pressing down on the water (not an effective way to "catch") and is also overloading her shoulder.

The image on the right shows a much more effective "catch." It's no surprise that her "lat" (the large back muscle you see inside the yellow circle) is literally exploding as she sets up her pull.

(A picture, or in this case video, is worth a thousand words and it doesn't lie. Which is one reason why this athlete was able to change on the spot - AND why I never go to the pool to coach without my underwater camera). 🙂

So what's the bottom line?

It's simple, really: There is NO single approach that will guarantee success for everyone.

Yes, there ARE universal concepts that apply to just about everybody. Things like...

  1. Attentive repetition: Over and over and over. Working in the sweet spot on the edge of your capability. Relentless. Remember Malcolm Gladwell's book Outliers and 10,000 hours?
  2. Interweaving and chunking: Do it, then take a break, then do it again.
  3. "Deep" practice: fully engaged in the process, instead of focused solely on an outcome.
  4. Being mindful: fully present in the moment.

Are YOU doing what YOU need to do, to improve?

 

I think coach Filliol was on target when he hinted that those with solid technique who aren't getting faster are simply not working hard enough. For those folks, lengthening the "main" sets and getting in more volume are key. For example, even with solid technique, expecting substantial improvement on a dose of 1 or 2 hours per week of swim training just isn't realistic.

Conversely, it's also true that some triathletes have very little understanding of the difference between effectively "catching" water...and "catching" a head cold. 🙂 For those folks, a deeper commitment to learning more, to be better equipped to decipher the difference between good and bad swimming and information is where to start.

And there are also some, that are so lacking in the necessary flexibility in the shoulders and back, any attempt to swim "correctly" will result in nothing but a whole lotta frustration.

Have we come to any conclusions as to why so many struggle?

 

One thing I believe we have learned, is that too many athletes waste valuable time and energy working in the wrong way and using the exact opposite ideal approach. Or they simply do not KNOW what the ideal approach is!

The real answer to our question is simple, but not necessarily easy:

Find out what the optimal approach is for YOU, and then... work relentlessly and mindfully with dogged determination. Take advantage of regular, objective feedback from someone you trust to help review and assess your progress, and then take what you learn, "tweak it" where you need to, and get back to work.       

So let me ask you a question....

Do you know what the best approach is for you?

Do you care?

If you DO, then maybe you would be interested in working with me in a small group coaching format. CLICK HERE to let me know you're interested in learning more about what I have planned.

Within this group coaching program, I will...

  1. help you learn the OPTIMAL approach to getting faster.
  2. program AND guide your practices and training.
  3. review your video and offer specific guidance on how to improve.
  4. work directly with YOU to find the best ways for you to get faster.

If this sounds interesting, know right up front that it won't be "easy" -  you'll have to work hard AND you're going to have to be accountable.

There aren't any real swimming #hacks. (I wish there were!)  Real improvements will come from commitment, hard work, and us working together as a TEAM. So, if you aren't willing to hold up your end, don't waste your time OR mine.

Here's WHY you might want to jump in and take advantage of this opportunity:

  • You want to finish near the front of your AG instead of at the back.
  • You've been swimming for years but still go slow compared to your training partners.
  • You want to look forward to the swim portion of the races you do, rather than dread them.
  • You get out of the water at your races, tired and hardly ready to attack the bike and run.
  • Your shoulders are sometimes sore, or worse, downright painful after your swims.
  • You're tired of going to the pool over and over, and never getting faster!!
  • You believe having some guidance and feedback from someone who has walked the walk would help you and save a lot of trial and error.

If any of the above bullets resonate with you, CLICK HERE to let me know you're interested. There is no commitment required right now, I'm simply assessing whether there is enough interest to run the group.

Do you REALLY want to improve? No Bulls**t. I'm very serious about this. If this speaks to you, CLICK HERE.

Happy laps!

~Coach Al

PS: Speaking of groups, I mentioned to you earlier about the group kettlebell training - I've had some really great interest in it. There's still time to get in on this but don't wait too long, January will be here before you know it! If you're interested in learning more, CLICK HERE.  

Team Pursuit Athletic Performance: It’s Been A Banner Year!

TEAM Pursuit Athletes at the 2013 Timberman Half Ironman triathlon!

TEAM Pursuit triathletes at the Timberman Half Ironman triathlon!

2014 was a banner year for Team Pursuit Athletic Performance.

It isn't just that we have expanded into a new training space on the top of Inspiration lane in Chester, Connecticut (with a completely new offering of classes and clinics for kids and adults in many different sports) OR that our team has grown at an unprecendented rate of speed. No, it's a lot more than just about a new training center or the numbers.

So what has made 2014 such a banner year?

Simply put, it has been the heart and soul of our team and our company, it is the people.

From novice to elite (and regardless of the sport), the person who finds a home as a member of Team Pursuit is friendly, supportive, humble, smart, compassionate, fun-loving and hard working. Our trainers and coaches are the same!

The start of the new year is a great time to reflect on why we are so proud of the work we do AND the athletes who make up our team.

So why should you choose Team Pursuit Athletic Performance?  Here are five reasons why....

  1. Fun, comraderie, sharing, hard work and achievement - together. Some teams or groups exist solely for the betterment of its leaders or to help someone else profit. Team Pursuit exists primarily to help make a real difference and empower ordinary people to achieve extraordinary things, amidst a genuine spirit of sharing, humility, fun, and comraderie.  
  2. Training for the betterment of the body, not to its detriment. Team Pursuit athletes believe that the ultimate 'goal' is to be in the game for the long term. They don't believe that any short term goal is worth sacrificing their body and damaging it for the long term. Some see training through injury as a sign of toughness, but not Team Pursuit. Many of our present day team members were once consistently injured and grew tired of it. You can read about their stories of redemption to a new better way to live and train. There really IS a better way. You CAN go faster than ever and be truly healthy too!
  3. Balance in all things. Family, sport, work, friends, community...they ALL matter and all are important for any person to lead a satisfying, rewarding, happy life. Balance might be the most over used cliche' word ever written, yet Team Pursuit athletes don't just give lip service to it. We preach it when it comes to our body and we LIVE it when it comes to how we reach higher and seek to explode our potential, on AND off the race course. Our own first-of-its-kind "Functional Well-Being" coaching program is just one example.
  4. Learning. Team Pursuit athletes might be defined most by this single concept: they love to learn! Life long learners achieve more, enjoy the training process more, and ultimately go faster too.
  5. Our staff of coaches, trainers, and sports medicine professionals is the very best available, anywhere. Rarely will you ever find the very best sports medicine advice AND professional coaching and racing expertise all under one roof. Combine those with a staff of dedicated professional coaches and trainers, and a team full of people who cherish the opportunity to reach out to each other and help, and you truly have a winning combination that is hard to beat.

2015 is going to be one amazing year!  We invite you to consider joining us on the journey!

Happy New Year to all!

 

Have You Ever Wanted To Learn How To Deadlift Safely?

DL Clinic FlierThe basic barbell deadlift is arguably the single BEST exercise you can do to build total body strength.

Back, legs, shoulders, hips, arms, and glutes - you hit them all with this powerhouse of an exercise.

The challenge is knowing how to do it safely.

Come join us for a FREE "Learn How To Deadlift" clinic on Wednesday, December 17th, at 6:30pm, where you will learn the basic skills required to perform a barbell (or kettlebell) deadlift.

No experience of any kind is required. Novices, do NOT BE intimidated - this clinic is for you! 

To register, call the Pursuit Training Center at 860-388-4248, or email: coachal@coachal.com

SPACE IS LIMITED to 20, so don't wait.  No walk-ins - in order to attend, you MUST email or call to register!

I hope to see you there!

~Coach Al 

 

Runners: Upcoming Strength & Flexibility Clinic

 

CKopcha-RunClinic

Meet Our Trainers: Zack Kraft-Shinn, Our Yoga Dragon

Pursuit Athletic Performance trainer and teacher, Zack Kraft-Shinn

Pursuit Athletic Performance trainer and teacher, Zack Kraft-Shinn

Here at Pursuit Athletic Performance, we are really proud of the awesome staff of trainers and coaches we have to help YOU improve!

Today we introduce our own "Yoga Dragon," Zack Kraft-Shinn. Zack teaches our very popular kid's bootcamp and kid's yoga, adult yoga and martial arts, and is also a personal trainer.  To learn more about Zack, check out his bio on our site here. 

Zack is an amazing teacher who is passionate about teaching and sharing his gifts with young and old alike. Zack says, "I believe that knowledge is food for your brain, and as a member of Team Pursuit, my hope is to share weekly motivational and educational thoughts." To that end, enjoy!

shadow-ornament

 

I wanted to start off strong with something “neurologically nutritious”, so I present this for your consideration:  Life's a battle. It's like a daily knife fight. An ever present struggle of balancing will and choice on a hairline edge.

I always ask myself, "How can I bring forth all of my energy to give my genetic gift and serve; while also making sure I take care of myself and my basic needs?” Every day is different. Some days I train more, so on those days I make sure to give myself a little extra time to stretch so my body doesn't break. I eat larger portions those days so my body can stay fueled rather than feed on itself. I make sure to drink extra water those days to aid in the recovery of my torn muscles so that they can repair themselves more efficiently. And I make sure I get adequate rest, which involves much more than just the time I lay my head down.  Just as important is the environment I rest in. Are the lights on? If so I shut them off as that will affect the quality of my rest. I do little things to make sure that when I wake up the following morning at 4am....I jump outta bed healed and ready to attack the day. Ready to read, train my yoga then head off to my first job…to make the morning muffins. (And in case you were wondering...YES…I am the muffin master as well!)

photo 2I know that if I don’t take care of myself, is I start to slip...It's much like taking that cut in the “daily life” knife fight. Yeah, it may not be a big deal right now, but man, I'm gonna feel that later. Say, for instance, I get home at 12:30 am and I’m starving because I forgot to pack a cliff bar or a banana. I open the fridge to see what my options are. There's some lasagna my mom made, a delicious piece of chocolate cake and some leftovers of the mouth-watering sub I got from JAMSS. (Kidding on the last one, I never have any leftovers from JAMSS! The plate is usually licked clean to be perfectly honest!) So I heat up the lasagna and eat it, then wash it down with the cake. Tastes great!  BUT, because I ate right before bed, my body can't heal itself! Instead of focusing on healing, it's using those essential calories to break down all that food. Plus, because my body is so used to breaking down food while in a standing position, it’s now working almost twice as hard to do so lying down. What did I do?  I set myself up for failure. When I wake up, I feel it instantly. Instead of jumping out of bed, it's a slow zombie crawl approach to the day! So instead I make a better choice…understanding that I'm placing want over need, I close the fridge and chug some water.

Making good choices is one thing, but there is another kind of blade that life can use to cut me.  The stuff that I have no control over. The unexpected. The variables I never saw. The family tragedy. The loss of a loved one or a career. The relationships that leave scars or weren’t destined to be a part of my path. But the experienced knife fighter understands that almost always in a knife fight, you’re gonna have to take a minor cut to give a better one. Sometimes losing the opportunity for a new job or some love fantasy we feel would make our lives better or enrich it in some way, is actually a blessing in disguise. From my experience, I know a lot of good is lost looking for something better. By thinking of all I've lost, I miss out on the present. My mind is caught in an endless cycle of despair and should've, would’ve, could’ve scenarios. Because my mind is in pain my body follows. My negative thoughts manifest themselves through discomfort in the body, starting with bad posture.   Because I'm hunched over, looking down, putting unwanted pressure on my neck and lower back...my breathing is then changed. I've created less space in my body for air, my lungs aren't working as cohesively with my heart to pump all those much needed hard working, freshly oxygenated blood cells to the vital organs, muscles etc.photo 1

Luckily, at some point in this process I’ll realize what’s happening. I understand that I'm not present, and I will find my focus by saying a mantra of some kind. (Mantra's are words or groups of words we can say verbally or in our heads to promote clarity.) My favorite is from the Bhagavad Gita. Arjuna is being counselled on the cusp of a battle that will tear the very fabric of reality. Krishna says to Arjuna, "If you bring forth what lies in your inner most self, what you bring forth will save you and it will save a piece of the world. If you do not bring forth what lies in your inner most self, what you do not bring forth will destroy you and it will destroy a piece of the world."

Cool, huh?? But hey, no pressure!  J   However, I challenge you! Ask yourself not “HOW can I change the world”, but instead “how AM I changing the world today?" Cause every thought you have manifests itself into reality. Not only actions, every thought you have changes the world!  Choose to be non- judgmental to a passerby. Give a smile, high five or a hug to someone you feel could really use it. (It will usually be met with a rather contagious case of the giggles that in turn leads to an outbreak!) OR GO BIG! Get involved with your local community! Pick up trash, offer help to those in need, sign up for a walk that has a cause that doesn't affect you or anyone you know... It's all good! So please, I encourage you to take care of yourself, because you have to change the world today.... Love, light and happiness, The Yoga Dragon, OSS

Also, special shout out to my two new good friends for helping me in my Pursuit of perfection. Sensei Doc and Shifu Coach. Love you guys!

~Zack
P.s. Special shout out to Mark and Ange at J.A.M.S.S. catering in Old Saybrook, Ct for hooking me up with the sponsorship! I can't thank you enough for all the culinary masterpieces you both make for me daily! Love you guys!

Ps.s. Also huge shout out to my friend and brother Tim Seabre for helping me with my new Yoga Dragon Tukano Gi's! I can’t wait to rock those on a daily basis! Many tribes, one root!

Meet Our Trainers: Christine Kopcha

 

Pursuit Athletic Performance personal trainer, Chris Kopcha

Pursuit Athletic Performance personal trainer, Chris Kopcha

Here at Pursuit Athletic Performance, we are really proud of the awesome staff of trainers and coaches we have to help YOU improve!

Today we introduce Chris Kopcha, who teaches yoga, bootcamp, and fitness classes at our new space in Chester, Connecticut: the Pursuit Training Center.  To learn more about Chris, check out her bio on our site here. 

Chris is passionate about teaching and helping others to get stronger and improve. She hopes YOU will come out and take some of her classes and learn what she and we have to offer first hand.

To that end, Chris shares her thoughts on yoga including TEN REASONS why YOU should join her in her "tree house" for class.


Our "tree house" yoga room at the Pursuit Training Center.

Our "tree house" yoga room at the Pursuit Training Center.

One of the misconceptions of yoga is that it is only for skinny 20-something girls in spandex who can twist themselves into a pretzel. Or vegan hippies that sit around chanting and meditating. While you do find some of these scenarios in yoga studios, yoga is for everyone and the benefits go much farther than being able to tie yourself in a very uncomfortable knot.
1. CORE: We all know that a stable, strong core is important in keeping you injury free. But your core consists of more than just your abs. It includes everything other than your head, arms and legs and incorporates almost every movement in the human body. Yoga works your core in 360 degrees! Flexibility and balance stem from your core.

2. FLEXIBILITY: Who doesn't want to increase their comfortable range of motion? How many people do you know can't reach down to tie their shoes or have a hard time reaching for their seat belt?  Flexibility is one attribute we associate with being and feeling younger.

3. BODY BALANCE: As we move into our later years this is important in keeping us active. Even tasks as simple as walking.....the ability to stand on one foot at a time while propelling yourself forward requires a great deal of balance.

4. TRAINING BALANCE: Every good exercise program needs to include aerobic training, strength work, and stretching! Many athletes tend to hit two out of three of these genres, keeping them from reaching their full potential!

5. SPEED: By learning about your body and how it moves, you can work with what you've got allowing you to become faster.

6. LOW IMPACT: Yoga is it! Which means it's great for seniors and anyone who has joint trouble.

7. LOWERS STRESS: By encouraging relaxation, focusing on your body and breathing, it reduces the effects of stress by lowering blood pressure, heart rate, and improving digestion.

8. THE BREATH: Yoga practice teaches us to take slower, deeper, healthier breaths, improving lung function and increasing the amount of oxygen available to the body.

9. CLEARS THE MIND: Yoga helps us un-clutter our mind. It allows us to be still in a world full of chaos.

10. JUMPSTART A HEALHTHIER YOU: Yoga can be the jump start you need toward a healthier lifestyle. It can be your first step on a path away from unhealthy stress and poor eating habits, toward healthier habits that lead to long term health and happiness.

11. BONUS: And if you are interested, you can ALSO learn some really cool party tricks like headstands, handstands, splits, and arm balances.

These work for me – what about YOU?

Hope to see you in the tree house AND on the mat soon!

~Chris

Pursuit Athletic Performance Announces Grand Opening and Open House

The grand opening and open house will celebrate our relocation and expansion to the new Pursuit Training Center on the top of Inspiration Lane!


On the heels of our recently held "Team Pursuit" open house (see all of the pictures below from that awesome event!), all of us at Pursuit Athletic Performance are excited to announce our upcoming open house and grand opening of the Pursuit Training Center on Wednesday, November 12 from 6pm to 8pm.

All are invited to meet the staff and tour our 7,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility located at 8 Inspiration Lane in Chester, Conn. As many of you know, we were previously located in a smaller space in Old Saybrook, Conn.

We are very excited about our expansion which allows us the opportunity to bring kids’ injury prevention boot-camp classes, adult fitness classes, yoga, strength and conditioning, and our unique advanced gait analysis process, to the entire Middlesex county region.

Join us and check out some of our unique equipment designed to help you get stronger and faster, including the awesome Vasa Swim Ergometers, and our own special Computrainer studio, appropriately nicknamed the "pain cave."

If you are unable to join us for this open house on November 12th, feel free to stop in any time and tour the space. We hope to see you soon!

Happy Training!

-Coach and Doc

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coach Al Presenting At Fit Werx New England Triathlon Symposium, February 2, 2013

On Saturday, February 2, Coach Al will be presenting a symposium and workshop at the fifth annual Fit Werx New England Triathlon Symposium! The symposium will be held at Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

The Symposium is a day of seminars, workshops, and clinics led by expert coaches. In the morning from 9-10 am, Coach Al is presenting The Fab 5: The Best Strength Exercises for Triathletes. His discussion will center on:

  • The universal principle of authentic movement that can be applied to all sports
  • Movement quality first
  • How to integrate strength training into a triathlon training plan
  • The Fab 5: basic to advanced progressions
  • Integration: whole body strength development

In the afternoon session, Coach Al will take participants into the weight room and guide proper execution and teach how to progress the strength work as an athlete gets stronger.

To read the full schedule of presentations and to sign up, visit the symposium page at Active.com. Hope to see you!

Fitwerx

Swim Clinic (And Bonus!) With Coach Al, January 26, UCONN, Avery Point Pool

Hello Everyone!

Swimmer_Web_SiteIt's the perfect time of year to get your swim set for the 2013 season! I will be running a swim clinic on Saturday, January 26 from 6-9 pm at the University of Connecticut at Avery Point. This will be a packed, three-hour clinic, designed to provide you with the tools you need to take your swimming to the next level.

What will you learn?

? mechanics of proper technique

? learn the right drills to groove proper technique

? learn why dry-land training is crucial

? why appropriate mobility & flexibility is essential

? know your limiters

Underwater swim video with individual review will be provided to each of you who attend.

*BONUS! We'll share an ala carte dinner following the clinic to talk all things swimming, or triathlon, or running, or.... whatever you care to cover. 🙂 AND, on Sunday, January 27, beginning at 8:30 am, all registrants are invited to an Open House at P ursuit Athletic Performance, 785 Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook, CT. Jump on the CompuTrainer with your bike, test the Vasa Ergometer, go for a group run, review strength and movement patterns. Best of all, more time to talk training!

Cost is:

$79 for Pursuit Athletic Performance Team

$119 for non-team members

Registration Options - Ultra-Running Camp

Register at Active.com through Thursday, January 24.

Hope to see you! Have any questions, fire away in the comments, or hit us up on Facebook!

~Coach Al