No One Wants To See How The Sausage Is Made

 

"That which is easy to do, is also easy not to do." - Jim Rohn


If I've become known for one thing more than any other, it's speaking the truth.  No, I'm not always right, but I do care. And because of that, I'm always going to be straight with you and tell it as I see it. Like it or hate it, it's what you get from me.

Now listen, I know that's not popular these days. People don't want to hear the truth, especially when it comes to building that fitness "wall" one brick at a time, or mastering the basics and fundamentals first.

No one wants to see how the sausage is made... 

Folks want cheering and applause, pats on the back, smiles and rah-rah.

Now that's all fine, don't get me wrong.  When it's truly deserved, that is. When it's EARNED.

Are You Bored?

I went to a National Strength and Conditioning Association coach's clinic last weekend. During a panel discussion, a presenter chimed in and said something that did NOT go over well with the group. I found it fascinating.

The guy who spoke up is a successful trainer. He was talking about how he’s recently had to change the way he does things. He said he's been forced to cave-in to the wishes of many of his clients, taking them beyond what they're really ready for at any given point in time. His words: "More of them are now routinely scouring Youtube videos - if I don't give them what they want, they get bored and move on."

All I can say to that is...wow.

No one wants to see how the sausage is made... 

 

Are You Self Sabotaging?

A benefit of having been a long time coach is recognizing trends that are typical for developing athletes, whether they are the novice, weekend warrior, or experienced pro.

One of the most common things I see (is it human nature?) is the tendency to self-sabotage the potential for massive long-term improvement in order to reach short term gain.  

A perfect example is the triathlete who fails to really focus on technique, instead choosing to log more yardage in order to build swim “fitness.”  Once you know you can FINISH the swim leg (especially with the aid of your wetsuit), why not decide to work relentlessly on the one thing that will make the greatest impact on how good you can be?  (Which is skill and technique!)

Whether you're nodding your head in agreement or not, if you're like most, you'll forsake that advice and just go swim, mile upon mile, grooving poor skills and trashing your shoulders in the process.

And if you're like many others, when you finally do decide that your skills are subpar, you’ll be faced with the fact that you’ve now hard-wired that poor form to the point where change is nearly impossible to achieve. 

No one wants to see how the sausage is made...

Want some other examples of how impatient athletes short circuit their potential for massive long term gains?

  • Building running mileage with the primary goal being an impressive running log, without first identifying imbalances and weaknesses in the body and addressing them head-on.
  • Signing up for long course races (70.3 or 140.6) without first developing a solid foundation of fundamental skills and experience at the shorter distances.
  • Spending $5,000 or more on a state-of-the-art triathlon bike before even owning a road or mountain bike or possessing any basic bike handling skills.

I know, I know..there are a lot of "reasons" why many athletes approach things this way. I've heard most of them.

Some feel they need more confidence to just "complete" the distance. Some are fired up by their newfound enthusiasm for the sport, and think they can jump on the "fast track" to improvements in durability and speed.

I think many take the easy way out by downplaying their own potential for improvement, or sell themselves very short when it comes to how good they can actually be.

No one wants to see how the sausage is made...

No one wants to hear the truth...

So let me ask you, do you REALLY know how good you can be? (Hint: NO, you don't).

Whether you like it or not, the truth is that YOUR greatest possibilities are built upon a solid foundation, AND mastery of the basics and fundamentals. It takes a long time to truly get good, which is one reason why I encourage folks to really embrace the process and enjoy the journey.

So who do you want to be? The athlete logging miles to get some additional "confidence,” or the one who is willing to pay their dues to achieve true, long term, massive gains in performance potential?

It’s up to you.

Happy trails!
~Coach Al

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